© 2015 The Nielsens

Dogdander
Day One: Here We Go Today’s mileage: 15 Total bike mileage so far: 15 Local Gas Prices: $2.89 in Eugene Weather: Hot with a headwind Saddle Sore-o-meter reading: 0 Animals for the day: Dogs on the bike path and a very handsome Kingfisher Crises Averted: smashed bike rack fixed      There must be a regulation in Eugene, Oregon about Ducks T-shirts. Every third person, adult and child, is wearing a shirt with a yellow and green Oregon Ducks logo on it. Used cars on the lot show the big square O for Oregon. The people on the billboards are wearing Oregon Ducks sportswear. The motels advertise enthusiasm about the Ducks. We feel obligated to exclaim, “Go Ducks!” Tomorrow we will change our tune in Corvallis. Go Beavers?       Eugene Oregon has streets laid out from North to South that are numbered. The train station is near 5th  Street. The East to West streets are named after the presidents of the United States. With apologies to historians, we admit that when the guy at the bike shop said we should turn left at Grant, we were only sure that we could find that street somewhere between Lincoln and Roosevelt. After a little research (sorry again, it’s Wikipedia), we find out that Eugene would have scored really low on the AP History test. Grant appeared in Eugene right after Tyler, Polk, Taylor, Almaden, and Chambers. Wait a second! They skipped a bunch of presidents and added some non-presidents. Everybody knows that!      Berta’s bike took a good hit on the train, possibly because of that truck. The rack was severely bent and the rear wheel was out of true. We went to a bike shop that was a block away from the motel and found a bike fanatic who had time to help us. He trued the wheel, overhauled the brakes, tuned up the shifting, and installed a brace for the rear fender Berta had “anchored” with electrical tape (hey, it’s black, it looks good). He gave us a bike for Berta to use for the morning. We only stopped once to adjust the seat on the loaner bike, then headed off to explore and find the night’s lodging. We found a hotel where we stayed two years ago.      A motivating factor for staying in West Eugene is a restaurant nearby the hotel that would be our favorite if we lived here. It is Jung’s Mongolian Grill and you will find it in a small strip mall in a Target parking lot. We stumbled on this gem two years ago when we pedaled the Oregon and California coast. For $8.95 during lunch or $11.95 during dinner, you get all you want to eat. They hand you a deep, wide bowl that probably holds six cups up to the rim. Many of the customers pile food way over the rim even though you can go back through the line as many times as you want. You take the bowl to a buffet bar and select noodles, vegetables, thin-sliced frozen meats, and sauces. The sauces include garlic water, coconut water, peanut sauce, curry, sesame, and several others. You place all of the ingredients you want (don’t forget the jalapenos and the hot Thai chiles) in the bowl and proceed to the line. A cook is ready to load 12 guests’ bowls on the steaming hot five-foot wide round flat metal grill. He proceeds with two metal spatulas to flip and toss the ingredients so the veggies are on the bottom, the meat is next, and the noodles are on top because they are already cooked. He travels around the grill, attending to each pile. Then, he circles again with a bottle of Teriyaki sauce. If you say yes, he douses your food. If no, he adds water for moisture. He tosses the food again to make sure everything is cooked. One more time around the grill and he loads your steaming food onto a plate.  Yum!           We returned to the bike shop to get Berta’s bike. She had been on another bike for maybe eight miles over the morning, and her real bike felt really strange! On the way back to the hotel, we stopped at the Bike Friday factory to see about taking a tour. Bike Friday makes foldable bikes. Their whole operation is right here in Eugene, next to the bike path, near the hotel where we are staying. When we arrived, Jeff was finishing a tour for ten silverback locals on bikes. He wrapped that up, invited us to move our bikes into the showroom for safety, and gave us the Nielsen Family private tour.      The Bike Friday factory is in one building that also holds the showroom, the offices, and the breakroom. The founder, his wife, and their daughter who is the current president all were at work today. They all looked like they were happy to see us touring their company. We heard a history of the company and then headed for the factory floor. The jigs for making the frames were behind a curtain near racks for the raw steel tubing. The two guys tacking bike frames were using torches with green flames and still took the time to look up and wave. There was a sandblasting booth and a small area for painting frames in a lot of fabulous colors. While Jeff gave us the tour, there was a woman in the corner of the building cutting up steel tubing with a circular saw that drowned out all sounds. We talked to a guy who was applying decals and packing up completed bikes. We both threw up our hands and ducked at the arc welding station when the welder started a weld as we walked by. Every person we walked past looked up and acknowledged us.      We headed off on the bike path on a couple of Bike Friday road bikes. The SRAM Red shifters have a neat feature where they have one lever that shifts down with a short click and up with a long swing. John had the higher end bike that was a little of a stretch for a tall rider. Berta had a pretty blue thing that was a lot of fun. And the thought that we could fit these in a suitcase was pretty fine. We gave the bikes back to Jeff and took our worldly possessions down the bike path to have our second Jung’s Mongolian Grill meal in one day. 

© 2015 The Nielsens

© 2015 The Nielsens

Dogdander
Day One: Here We Go Today’s mileage: 15 Total bike mileage so far: 15 Local Gas Prices: $2.89 in Eugene Weather: Hot with a headwind Saddle Sore-o-meter reading: 0 Animals for the day: Dogs on the bike path and a very handsome Kingfisher Crises Averted: smashed bike rack fixed      There must be a regulation in Eugene, Oregon about Ducks T-shirts. Every third person, adult and child, is wearing a shirt with a yellow and green Oregon Ducks logo on it. Used cars on the lot show the big square O for Oregon. The people on the billboards are wearing Oregon Ducks sportswear. The motels advertise enthusiasm about the Ducks. We feel obligated to exclaim, “Go Ducks!” Tomorrow we will change our tune in Corvallis. Go Beavers?       Eugene Oregon has streets laid out from North to South that are numbered. The train station is near 5th Street. The East to West streets are named after the presidents of the United States. With apologies to historians, we admit that when the guy at the bike shop said we should turn left at Grant, we were only sure that we could find that street somewhere between Lincoln and Roosevelt. After a little research (sorry again, it’s Wikipedia), we find out that Eugene would have scored really low on the AP History test. Grant appeared in Eugene right after Tyler, Polk, Taylor, Almaden, and Chambers. Wait a second! They skipped a bunch of presidents and added some non-presidents. Everybody knows that!      Berta’s bike took a good hit on the train, possibly because of that truck. The rack was severely bent and the rear wheel was out of true. We went to a bike shop that was a block away from the motel and found a bike fanatic who had time to help us. He trued the wheel, overhauled the brakes, tuned up the shifting, and installed a brace for the rear fender Berta had “anchored” with electrical tape (hey, it’s black, it looks good). He gave us a bike for Berta to use for the morning. We only stopped once to adjust the seat on the loaner bike, then headed off to explore and find the night’s lodging. We found a hotel where we stayed two years ago.      A motivating factor for staying in West Eugene is a restaurant nearby the hotel that would be our favorite if we lived here. It is Jung’s Mongolian Grill and you will find it in a small strip mall in a Target parking lot. We stumbled on this gem two years ago when we pedaled the Oregon and California coast. For $8.95 during lunch or $11.95 during dinner, you get all you want to eat. They hand you a deep, wide bowl that probably holds six cups up to the rim. Many of the customers pile food way over the rim even though you can go back through the line as many times as you want. You take the bowl to a buffet bar and select noodles, vegetables, thin-sliced frozen meats, and sauces. The sauces include garlic water, coconut water, peanut sauce, curry, sesame, and several others. You place all of the ingredients you want (don’t forget the jalapenos and the hot Thai chiles) in the bowl and proceed to the line. A cook is ready to load 12 guests’ bowls on the steaming hot five- foot wide round flat metal grill. He proceeds with two metal spatulas to flip and toss the ingredients so the veggies are on the bottom, the meat is next, and the noodles are on top because they are already cooked. He travels around the grill, attending to each pile. Then, he circles again with a bottle of Teriyaki sauce. If you say yes, he douses your food. If no, he adds water for moisture. He tosses the food again to make sure everything is cooked. One more time around the grill and he loads your steaming food onto a plate.  Yum!           We returned to the bike shop to get Berta’s bike. She had been on another bike for maybe eight miles over the morning, and her real bike felt really strange! On the way back to the hotel, we stopped at the Bike Friday factory to see about taking a tour. Bike Friday makes foldable bikes. Their whole operation is right here in Eugene, next to the bike path, near the hotel where we are staying. When we arrived, Jeff was finishing a tour for ten silverback locals on bikes. He wrapped that up, invited us to move our bikes into the showroom for safety, and gave us the Nielsen Family private tour.      The Bike Friday factory is in one building that also holds the showroom, the offices, and the breakroom. The founder, his wife, and their daughter who is the current president all were at work today. They all looked like they were happy to see us touring their company. We heard a history of the company and then headed for the factory floor. The jigs for making the frames were behind a curtain near racks for the raw steel tubing. The two guys tacking bike frames were using torches with green flames and still took the time to look up and wave. There was a sandblasting booth and a small area for painting frames in a lot of fabulous colors. While Jeff gave us the tour, there was a woman in the corner of the building cutting up steel tubing with a circular saw that drowned out all sounds. We talked to a guy who was applying decals and packing up completed bikes. We both threw up our hands and ducked at the arc welding station when the welder started a weld as we walked by. Every person we walked past looked up and acknowledged us.      We headed off on the bike path on a couple of Bike Friday road bikes. The SRAM Red shifters have a neat feature where they have one lever that shifts down with a short click and up with a long swing. John had the higher end bike that was a little of a stretch for a tall rider. Berta had a pretty blue thing that was a lot of fun. And the thought that we could fit these in a suitcase was pretty fine. We gave the bikes back to Jeff and took our worldly possessions down the bike path to have our second Jung’s Mongolian Grill meal in one day.