© 2015 The Nielsens

Dogdander
Day Three: Can I see your ID? Corvallis to Salem, Oregon Today’s mileage: 42 Total bike mileage so far: 115 Local Gas Prices: $2.89 in Salem Weather: Hot with a breeze Saddle Sore-o-meter reading: 1 Animals for the day: Alpacas Crops seen: Hay and wine grapes Crises Averted: The Northwest is safe from overage drinking      The big headwind we faced yesterday did not materialize today. For now, our optimism in travelling north from Eugene was justified.      There was a bike path just off the highway for miles and miles today. We pedaled along for an hour with a guy in a racing wheelchair keeping up behind us (even if he is in a wheelchair, we still need to beat him). The roadway was just twenty feet away. It was spectacular new asphalt, but it was so new that there were no stripes painted yet. It is hard to describe how valuable a good stripe is to a bicyclist, so we were glad to be on the path. We passed a lavender farm where they sold lavender lemonade. They sold it, but we didn’t buy it. Some miles later, at a spot where the path took a tall dedicated bridge over a wide highway, there was a bench, a memorial plaque, a flagpole, and a mailbox with its flag up. Inside the mailbox was a tattered spiral bound log for passing cyclists. It had entries going back five years. We added our names, “Eugene to Seattle” and Berta made some doodles of a train and some bikes. Berta adding our names to the bike log      We knew from previous rides in Oregon that there are high taxes on alcohol here. We did not know that even people who have passed 21 three times get carded here. We were standing in a gas station with a six-dollar bottle of chardonnay for purchase when the young woman cashier asked us both for our identification. So maybe Berta, who has passed 21 twice herself, was trying to get John to buy alcohol for her? If so, maybe Berta should have selected a nice Rhone blend? We wondered what has become of us when we cannot assume that a person who justifiably carries an AARP card cannot be trusted to buy a wine with subtle citrus notes and a mineral finish.

© 2015 The Nielsens

Day Three: Can I see your ID? Corvallis to Salem, Oregon Today’s mileage: 42 Total bike mileage so far: 115 Local Gas Prices: $2.89 in Salem Weather: Hot with a breeze Saddle Sore-o-meter reading: 1 Animals for the day: Alpacas Crops seen: Hay and wine grapes Crises Averted: The Northwest is safe from overage drinking      The big headwind we faced yesterday did not materialize today. For now, our optimism in travelling north from Eugene was justified.      There was a bike path just off the highway for miles and miles today. We pedaled along for an hour with a guy in a racing wheelchair keeping up behind us (even if he is in a wheelchair, we still need to beat him). The roadway was just twenty feet away. It was spectacular new asphalt, but it was so new that there were no stripes painted yet. It is hard to describe how valuable a good stripe is to a bicyclist, so we were glad to be on the path. We passed a lavender farm where they sold lavender lemonade. They sold it, but we didn’t buy it. Some miles later, at a spot where the path took a tall dedicated bridge over a wide highway, there was a bench, a memorial plaque, a flagpole, and a mailbox with its flag up. Inside the mailbox was a tattered spiral bound log for passing cyclists. It had entries going back five years. We added our names, “Eugene to Seattle” and Berta made some doodles of a train and some bikes. Berta adding our names to the bike log      We knew from previous rides in Oregon that there are high taxes on alcohol here. We did not know that even people who have passed 21 three times get carded here. We were standing in a gas station with a six-dollar bottle of chardonnay for purchase when the young woman cashier asked us both for our identification. So maybe Berta, who has passed 21 twice herself, was trying to get John to buy alcohol for her? If so, maybe Berta should have selected a nice Rhone blend? We wondered what has become of us when we cannot assume that a person who justifiably carries an AARP card cannot be trusted to buy a wine with subtle citrus notes and a mineral finish.